Today was a day of immense gratitude and profound emotion as we delivered hundreds of bags of food, water, and generators to our brothers and sisters still suffering from the devastating aftermath of Hurricane Beryl in the south. This life-saving mission was made possible through the overwhelming generosity of our incredible sponsors. Your support has brought not just supplies, but hope and light to those in desperate need.

A heartfelt and resounding thank you to Mr. Howard Levy, the compassionate COO of Airlink. His selfless act of providing an airplane transformed a grueling three-hour drive into a swift 15-minute flight, ensuring our emergency supplies reached those in dire need without delay. Mr. Levy, your kindness has been a beacon of hope. G‑d bless you abundantly!

But our journey was not without its challenges. We faced heartbreaking delays at customs that tested our resolve. Knowing our friends in St. Elizabeth were without power, we quickly mobilized volunteers to bring relief generators. Despite informing Jamaican customs ahead of time and preparing all necessary documents, we were met with a wall of indifference and bureaucracy. The customs officer, fully aware of the urgency, refused to release the items without a broker, ignoring the immediate need for power and compassion. Our pleas fell on deaf ears, and we could not reach higher supervisors to intervene.

Forced to wait until the next day, our dedicated broker worked tirelessly to complete the paperwork by 3 PM, only to be told that customs fees needed to be paid and the office was closing. This critical information, if provided earlier, could have saved precious time. In a race against the clock, we dashed across town to the port, paid the fees, and finally, with immense relief, received the generators.

Meanwhile, at Chabad headquarters in Montego Bay, after eight days of darkness, we finally regained electricity on Tuesday night. But as Wednesday night arrived, we realized we were without water. Desperation set in as we searched for our regular water truck, reaching out to friends for contacts, but to no avail. It wasn't until Thursday night that we found a kind man from a company called Quick Wata in Montego Bay, who filled up our tanks. 

This experience brought tears to our eyes and made us feel exactly how the Jews felt in the desert after Miriam passed away and they had no water. It gave us a deeper understanding of the suffering our brothers and sisters in the south are enduring without water. We are committed to helping them by providing at least 20 water tanks so that no one is left without this essential resource.

We call upon customs authorities to show greater compassion and humanity in future emergencies. These moments require swift, empathetic action to save lives and alleviate suffering. We are profoundly grateful to our sponsors and volunteers for their unwavering dedication and support. Your efforts are the lifeline for so many, and together, we strive for more efficient and compassionate responses in our relief efforts.

But the need is far from over. Friends, there are still more families languishing in darkness, waiting for a glimmer of hope. We urgently need five more generators to meet the demand. Please, open your hearts and donate now. Your generosity can turn despair into hope, darkness into light.

Thank you, and may G‑d bless you all abundantly.

Please click here to contribute to our ongoing relief efforts.

Together, we can rebuild and provide essential support to those who need it most.

 


Photos
 

 


Update #5

How YOU Delivered Hope Despite Customs Challenges

Today was a day of immense gratitude and profound emotion as we delivered hundreds of bags of food, water, and generators to our brothers and sisters still suffering from the devastating aftermath of Hurricane Beryl in the south. This life-saving mission was made possible through the overwhelming generosity of our incredible sponsors. Your support has brought not just supplies, but hope and light to those in desperate need.

A heartfelt and resounding thank you to Mr. Howard Levy, the compassionate COO of Airlink. His selfless act of providing an airplane transformed a grueling three-hour drive into a swift 15-minute flight, ensuring our emergency supplies reached those in dire need without delay. Mr. Levy, your kindness has been a beacon of hope. G‑d bless you abundantly!

 

But our journey was not without its challenges. We faced heartbreaking delays at customs that tested our resolve. Knowing our friends in St. Elizabeth were without power, we quickly mobilized volunteers to bring relief generators. Despite informing Jamaican customs ahead of time and preparing all necessary documents, we were met with a wall of indifference and bureaucracy. The customs officer, fully aware of the urgency, refused to release the items without a broker, ignoring the immediate need for power and compassion. Our pleas fell on deaf ears, and we could not reach higher supervisors to intervene.

Forced to wait until the next day, our dedicated broker worked tirelessly to complete the paperwork by 3 PM, only to be told that customs fees needed to be paid and the office was closing. This critical information, if provided earlier, could have saved precious time. In a race against the clock, we dashed across town to the port, paid the fees, and finally, with immense relief, received the generators.

Meanwhile, at Chabad headquarters in Montego Bay, after eight days of darkness, we finally regained electricity on Tuesday night. But as Wednesday night arrived, we realized we were without water. Desperation set in as we searched for our regular water truck, reaching out to friends for contacts, but to no avail. It wasn't until Thursday night that we found a kind man from a company called Quick Wata in Montego Bay, who filled up our tanks. 

 

This experience brought tears to our eyes and made us feel exactly how the Jews felt in the desert after Miriam passed away and they had no water. It gave us a deeper understanding of the suffering our brothers and sisters in the south are enduring without water. We are committed to helping them by providing at least 20 water tanks so that no one is left without this essential resource.

We call upon customs authorities to show greater compassion and humanity in future emergencies. These moments require swift, empathetic action to save lives and alleviate suffering. We are profoundly grateful to our sponsors and volunteers for their unwavering dedication and support. Your efforts are the lifeline for so many, and together, we strive for more efficient and compassionate responses in our relief efforts.

But the need is far from over. Friends, there are still more families languishing in darkness, waiting for a glimmer of hope. We urgently need five more generators to meet the demand. Please, open your hearts and donate now. Your generosity can turn despair into hope, darkness into light.

Thank you, and may G‑d bless you all abundantly.

 


Update #4

Update from Our Relief Efforts in Treasure Beach

Hello Rabbi,

I am so happy to report how grateful the people are to have received the food supplies and water. I made 42 bags, and then about 20 more people came to my gate with their own bags. By 10 am, everything was finished except for half a case of mackerel.

 

Please, if you can, come again, as I didn't get to Frenchman's, Great Bay, or Billy's Bay. All the food and water were extremely welcomed. I stopped at the most damaged houses—it was shocking to see walls down and roofs torn off. Families were gathered together outside, looking so forlorn. People's lives, homes, and livelihoods have been destroyed. It's a very terrible situation here in Treasure Beach, and we are just at the beginning of the season.

I am trying to clean up my own disaster site, but it's way too much. I will board up windows for now, as I'm sure more bad weather is on its way, and I don't want to go through this ever again.

 

I am grateful for the personal touch—it meant so very much to me. And the water and the tarps—thank you!

If you have an extra working generator, I would really love one. It seems we will be without power for a very long time.

I feel so blessed to be a part of Chabad. You told me before the storm that you were here for me, and so it was said, and so it is. I am forever grateful to you, Rabbi. I just love how our Jews are all such mensches. This entire experience sits very deep in my heart.

With sincerest thanks on behalf of my community,

Ronda

 

Dear Friends,

We urgently need more funds to provide serious roof repairs and generators. Please donate now on this special day of the Rebbe’s Yartzeit. Your support can make a tremendous difference in helping those affected by the storm.

Thank you for your generosity.

Rabbi Yaakov Raskin
Chabad of Jamaica


Update #3

Devastation in Treasure Beach: A Call for Urgent Help

It's 12:49 am, and we have just returned from Treasure Beach, witnessing the heartbreaking devastation firsthand. As we entered the main road, we saw an elderly couple sitting outside their destroyed home, roofless and hopeless. We stopped to give them food, water, and a tarp to cover their exposed belongings. The despair in their eyes is something we will never forget.

 

Searching for Ronda, a woman who had been out of contact since the storm began, our resolve only grew stronger as darkness fell. Baruch HaShem, we found her just minutes before nightfall. Calling out her name with no answer, we entered her driveway and approached her house. Ronda, in tears, recounted the harrowing experience of seeking refuge in her bathroom during the storm. She was overwhelmed with gratitude and attributed her survival to G‑d.

We left the majority of our supplies with Ronda and asked her to distribute them to others in need on our behalf. She gladly agreed and guided us to another resident, Joshua, whose roof was destroyed and house flooded. We provided him with battery packs to keep his cell phone charged, as certain areas had Starlink internet access thanks to another group’s efforts.

 

The devastation in the southern regions of Jamaica is immense. Many homes are destroyed, and communities are left without basic necessities. We are working tirelessly to provide relief and support to everyone in need. Our efforts include offering food, water, and protection to those affected. We would really like to help them out with building supplies and generators. We are still relying on our generator to power our operations, emphasizing the critical nature of our situation.

As we commemorate Gimmel Tammuz, the Rebbe’s 30th yahrzeit, we reflect on his enduring legacy and guidance. The Rebbe often reminded us that we are in the last generation of this dark exile, and that through acts of goodness and kindness, we can bring the ultimate light of redemption to the world. 

 

I am reminded of a story about the Rebbe's care for every individual. Once, a young man came to the Rebbe seeking advice and comfort. The Rebbe spent hours listening to him, offering wisdom and support, demonstrating that no matter the challenge, we must always be there for one another. This spirit of unwavering compassion and dedication to helping others is what drives our mission here in Jamaica.

 

The Rebbe said, “A little light dispels a lot of darkness.” Now, more than ever, we must take action. Every small act of kindness brings us closer to the final redemption. We urgently need your support. If you haven't already, please donate now. Our community is in desperate need, and your contribution can make an immeasurable difference.

Thank you for your unwavering support and dedication.
 


 

Devastation of Treasure Beach, Saint Elizabeth, Jamaica by Hurricane Beryl , Part 2 #treasurebeach #hurricaneberyl

 

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

A post shared by Sheldon Levene - Jamaica (@sheldonlev)

 


Ronda: "G-D Saves Lives!"

 


St. Elizabeth
 


Meeting Ronda


Update #2
Day 5: We still have no electricity
On Hurricane-Battered Jamaica, Chabad Brings Faith, Food, and Friendship

By Tzemach Feller

Thank you, Hashem! One year ago, after many outages, we were blessed with a generous donor who sponsored a generator for us. While our generator turned off for 8 hours during Shabbos, we feel very fortunate compared to those in places with no roofs. Because of this support, we have been able to assist our fellow Yidden who are without running water and electricity, and have them stay with us at Chabad during this challenging time.

 

#HurricaneBeryl

The situation in the south is dire. A friend who visited St. Elizabeth described it as a terrible situation beyond explanation. We are doing everything we can to help.

We are heading soon to the south with food and water. Just got off a call with local Jews in areas where electricity won’t be restored for weeks. We are trying to get them generators. A small generator costs $1,200. So far, we have one donor contributing a generator, but we need another 9 to cover the immediate needs.

 

Thank you to all who have donated already. Your generosity is making a tangible difference. But we still need more support to reach everyone in need.

Please donate so we can help everyone. Every contribution, no matter the size, brings us closer to providing relief and hope to those affected.

 



Update #1

Urgent: Help Us Help others Rebuild After Hurricane Beryl’s Devastation

We are grateful to G‑d that we are safe, though we are currently assessing the extent of the damage to our property. 

The winds and rain have subsided,  but the situation is critical across the Island, leaving dozens of communities devastated. 

Hundreds of thousands of homes in Jamaica remain without power, many have lost access to clean water, and countless homes lie destroyed in the wake of Hurricane Beryl. The category four storm, one of the most powerful to ever hit the country, swept along the island's southern coast on Wednesday night, bringing more than 12 hours of devastatingly heavy rain and strong winds.

Chabad aid is on the ground and ready to assist. If you or anyone you know needs help, please don't hesitate to reach out. We are dedicated to supporting everyone affected by this catastrophe.

For those who are able to contribute, your donations are urgently needed and deeply appreciated. Your support will make a meaningful difference in our relief efforts.

Please click here to contribute to our ongoing relief efforts.

Together, we can rebuild and provide essential support to those who need it most.


Manchester, Jamaica

 


'It's a disaster': Hurricane Beryl batters Jamaica
By Vanessa Buschschlüter and Jaroslav Lukiv, 
BBC News

Powerful Hurricane Beryl has hit Jamaica with heavy winds and rain, damaging buildings and felling trees on the Caribbean island.

The category four storm brought winds of up to 130mph (215km/h) on Jamaica's southern coast.

Social media photos show floodwater pouring down streets, with roofs ripped off by the wind.
The storm has killed at least seven people so far as it sweeps across the Caribbean. It has now been downgraded to a category three storm, and is due to make landfall in Mexico later on Friday.

"It's terrible. Everything's gone. I'm in my house and scared," Amoy Wellington, resident of a rural farming community in the southern St Elizabeth parish, was quoted as saying by Reuters news agency.

"It's a disaster."

Prime Minister Andrew Holness earlier urged people to "take this hurricane seriously".

"If you live in a low-lying area, an area historically prone to flooding and landslide, or if you live on the banks of a river or a gully, I implore you to evacuate to a shelter or to safer ground," he said.

 


Hurricane Beryl leaves 2 dead in Jamaica and cuts path of destruction as Mexico prepares for impact
By Patrick Smith
NBC News

Hurricane Beryl churned toward the Cayman Islands and Mexico on Thursday after leaving a trail of destruction in southern Jamaica, killing at least two people on the island nation, bringing down power lines, and leaving hundreds homeless and in shelters.

The Jamaica Constabulary Force told NBC News that one man and one woman had died as a result of the storm in the last 24 hours. The man, age 26, was swept away by floodwaters in the capital, Kingston, on Wednesday evening.

“He was playing football with friends at the mini stadium when the ball went outside, and he attempted to retrieve it,” police said. A search is underway for another man who was swept away by floodwaters, they added.

That brings the total dead this week as a result of Beryl in the Caribbean to nine.

The storm has now diminished to a Category 3 storm with sustained winds of 115 mph — but widespread damage is still expected in the Caymans, where a hurricane warning is in place Thursday as the storm's eye moves toward the south of the islands.

Strong winds, storm surges, damaging waves, between 4 and 6 inches of rain and floods are all expected in the Caymans and in parts of Mexico and Belize from Thursday night.

Some communities on Mexico’s Caribbean coast were evacuated, and sea turtle eggs were moved away from beaches before a storm surge could destroy them. A hurricane watch was issued for the country's Yucatan Peninsula, along the coast from Cancun to Costa Maya

 


Hurricane Beryl roars by Jamaica after killing at least 7 people in the southeast Caribbean
By John Myers Jr. and Renloy Trail
The Associated Press

KINGSTON, Jamaica (AP) — Hurricane Beryl was roaring by Jamaica Wednesday, bringing fierce winds and heavy rain after the powerful Category 4 storm earlier killed at least seven people and caused significant damage in the southeast Caribbean.

The U.S. National Hurricane Center said Beryl’s eyewall was “brushing the south coast of Jamaica.”

Wind-whipped rain pounded the island for hours as residents heeded authorities’ call to shelter until the storm had passed. Power was knocked out in much of the capital.

 


Hurricane Beryl lashes Jamaica as its center brushes past island coast
By: Patrick Smith and Minyvonne Burke and Phil Helsel
NBC News

Hurricane Beryl lashed Jamaica with strong winds and a deluge of rain and powerful waves before the Category 4 storm pulled away on a path that will take it near the Cayman Islands, officials said.

Beryl had maximum sustained winds of 140 mph as its center skirted the southern coast of the Caribbean nation of 2.8 million Wednesday afternoon, and by 11 p.m. its center was past the island and continuing west in the Caribbean, the National Hurricane Center said.

The storm, which had made history as the strongest hurricane ever recorded in July before it was downgraded from Category 5 to Category 4, has been blamed for at least seven deaths as it devastated parts of the Windward Islands and caused flooding and damage in Venezuela.

Around 500 people in Jamaica were in shelters, Holness said. Authorities in the Cayman Islands also opened shelters.

The hurricane, with maximum sustained winds of around 130 mph, was forecast to pass just south of the Cayman Islands overnight into Thursday, the hurricane center said.

 


Surviving Hurricane Beryl: Chabad House Jamaica's Response




Hurricane Beryl in Jamaica